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Collapse of Compliance
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Compliance Coal: Sour Grapes

CEAA terminates its review of the Raven Underground Coal Project

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, May 19, 2016

Ottawa — May 19, 2016 — The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (the Agency) has terminated the comprehensive study of the Raven Underground Coal Mine Project (the Project) pursuant to the former Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.

B.C. auditor general slams mining sector in report

Gordon Hoekstra, Vancouver Sun, May 4 2016

BC Auditor-General Carol BellringerB.C.’s auditor general delivered a damning report Tuesday that concluded the province’s compliance and enforcement actions in the mining sector are not adequate to protect the environment.

The report’s chief recommendation is the creation of an independent and integrated compliance and enforcement unit outside the ministry of mines.

B.C. doing poor job monitoring mining industry, audit finds

Justine Hunter, Globe and Mail, May 03, 2016

Auditor-General report on mining sectorVICTORIA — The B.C. government’s management of the mining industry is failing to protect the environment against significant risk, Auditor-General Carol Bellringer has concluded after a two-year investigation that found a regulatory regime defined by too few resources, infrequent inspections and a lack of enforcement.

Raven Coal Mine: A Citizen Autopsy

Mike Bell, Island Tides, May 5 2016

It is fitting that we are celebrating the demise of Compliance Energy and its Raven Coal Mine project. Members of our community and our First Nations fought the project tooth and nail for more than five years. It is indeed time for a celebration. But it is also time for a citizen autopsy. What have we learned?

Eight B.C. mines get power break worth $8 million per montn

Derrick Penner, The Province, April 27, 2016

Copper Mtn MineBritish Columbia mines are getting a break worth $8 million per month from the provincial program that allows them to defer most of their most of their BC Hydro bills during tough times. Eight mines have signed up, according to the Ministry of Energy and Mines.

Paperwork finalized on Raven coal mine termination

Comox Valley Record, April 12, 2016

In a letter dated April 4, 2016 the BC Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) informed Compliance Coal Corporation (Compliance) that the Environmental Assessment (EA) review for the Raven Coal Mine Project had been terminated.

'Final nail in coffin' for Raven coal mine

John Harding, Parksville - Qualicum Beach News, April 12, 2016

Any suggestions the Raven coal mine project near Buckley Bay could still happen were quashed last week when the the B.C. Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) terminated its review of the Raven project.

Raven Coal demise should spark a better direction

Torrance Coste, Times Colonist, April 10 2016

Late on Wednesday, B.C’s Environmental Assessment Office pulled the plug on its review of the Raven Coal project. The decision to terminate the review is the final nail in the coffin for Raven Coal and a victory for the communities that fought this proposal for more than six years.

For Raven coal mine opponents, relief as project is terminated

Lindsay Kines, Times Colonist, April 8 2016

Opponents of the proposed Raven coal mine near Courtenay are celebrating after the B.C. government pulled the plug on the controversial project.

The province terminated the mine’s environmental assessment this week after Compliance Energy Corp. failed to submit the information required by government officials.

BC Finally Terminates Environmental Assessment for Raven Coal Mine

News Release, Wilderness Committee, April 7, 2016

Baynes Sound - Downstream from terminated Raven Coal MineVICTORIA – The Wilderness Committee is celebrating an announcement by the BC Environmental Assessment Office (EAO) late yesterday afternoon, which terminated the assessment for the proposed Raven Coal Mine in the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island.
 
The Wilderness Committee has stood in opposition to the proposed mine for six years because of the risks to local water quality, ecosystems, public safety, more sustainable industries and our shared climate.

BC EAO Terminates Environmental Assessment of Raven Underground Coal Project

CoalWatch News, April 6, 2016

On April 4, 2016, Kevin Jardine, Executive Director of the BC Environmental Assessment Office sent a letter to James O'Rourke, Chairman of Compliance Energy Corp., in which he states that he has decided to terminate the environmental assessment for the Raven Underground Coal Project.

The Obama administration is about to kneecap its own efforts to reform coal leasing

David Roberts, VOX.com, April 1 2016

 

Over the past year or so, the Obama administration has shown increasing sympathy toward the new climate activism mantra: "Keep it in the ground."

Scotland just ended its coal power production

Cecilia Jamasmie, Mining.com, March 24, 2016

Scotland has stopped generating electricity from coal for the first time in more than 100 years, as its Longannet power station, north of the capital Edinburgh, switched off the last of its four generating units Thursday afternoon.

Raven coal finally dead

Editorial, Alberni Valley News, March 8 2016

If there was anything attractive about the Raven coal mine proposal, it was jobs.

Then again, jobs at what price?

EAO to Compliance ex-Chairman O'Rourke: advise if you intend to proceed with the environmental assessment of Raven project

Shelley Murphy, BC Environmental Assessment Office, February 26 2016

James (Jim) O’Rourke, Chairman
Compliance Coal Corporation
Suite 550 - 800 West Pender Street
Vancouver BC V6C 2V6
jim@cumtn.com

Dear Mr. O’Rourke:

I am writing to you in follow up to the letter dated August 25, 2015, from Mr. Steve Ellis, then President and Chief Operating Officer of Compliance Coal Corporation (Compliance).

Environment Minister Polack says Raven Project decision by end of March

CoalWatch News, March 2 2016

During debate on the Ministry of Environment Budget Estimates on March 1, the MLA for Alberni-Qualicum, Scott Fraser, asked Environment Minister Mary Polack:

"When will this environmental assessment [for the Raven Underground Mine Project] be brought to a close?"

Minister Polack replied:

"The member outlined the timeline on this project. The environmental assessment office can, as a result of this time delay, decide to update the information requirements, or they can choose to terminate the environmental assessment. That's allowable to them under the Environmental Assessment Act. They intend, I am advised, to make those decisions by the end of March - so, the end of this month."

Trudeau and premiers need to phase out dirty coal

Ed Whittingham & Peter Robinson, Leader Post, March 3 2016

Where does our electricity come from? In a warming world — increasingly dependent on smartphones and driven by electric vehicles — it is an important question.

Courtenay coal mine executives, resign, company deemed insolvent

Lindsay Kines, Times Colonist, March 2 2016

The directors of the company behind the proposed Raven coal mine near Courtenay have resigned in what opponents hope is the “final nail in the coffin” for the project.

Directors of company proposing Raven Coal mine resign en masse

John Harding, Parksville Qualicum Beach News, March 1 2016

With the en masse resignation of its board of directors, Compliance Energy Corporation has signalled the end of the proposed Raven Coal Mine project, said the president of a Mid-Island watchdog group.

Compliance resignations the last nail in the Raven Coal Project coffin

Press Release, CoalWatch Comox Valley Society, February 29 2016

In light of the February 26, 2016 press release by Compliance Energy Corporation (Compliance) that the board members and company officers have resigned, it appears the final chapter of the Raven Coal Mine Project saga is about to be written.

Compliance Energy Announces Resignation of Board Members

News Release, Compliance Energy Corp., February 26 2016

VANCOUVER, Feb. 26, 2016 /CNW/ - Compliance Energy Corporation (the "Company") is disappointed to announce that its Board of Directors, in its entirety, has resigned this week.  The withdrawal of the Company's major Korean and Japanese partners from the Raven project, which was precipitated by the Environmental Assessment Office's protracted process of developing an acceptable Application Information Requirements for the project, followed by the EAO's resistance in accepting a fully developed Application for stakeholder review, has made it impossible to raise further funds, attract alternate partners or to sell the project.

The US coal industry is falling apart. Here's the surprising reason why.

David Roberts, VOX.com, 22 Feb 2016

The US coal mining industry is collapsing.

Consider this remarkable fact, from a new report by the Rhodium Group:

The four largest US miners by output (Peabody Energy, Arch Coal, Cloud Peak Energy, and Alpha Natural Resources), which account for nearly half of US production, were worth a combined $34 billion at their peak in 2011. Today they are worth $150 million.

Dozens of US mining companies have declared bankruptcy in the past few years. More are on the verge.

What's going on? What is killing US coal?

Coffee with ... John Snyder

Scott Stanfield, Comox Valley Record, January 20 2016

As the winner of the Wilderness Committee’s 2015 Eugene Rogers Environmental Award, John Snyder is sharing a place with the likes of local conservationist Ruth Masters and biologist Alexandra Morton.

He is also $1,000 richer, but the money didn’t land in his bank account. Instead, Snyder is putting it into the account of the CoalWatch Comox Valley Society, which he has served as president for several years.

Last working coal mine on Vancouver Island shuts down, marking end of era

All Points West, CBC, Jan 17 2016

'In so many ways, coal has laid the foundation for the island," says historian

The last working coal mine on Vancouver Island has halted production indefinitely, marking the end of an industry that established towns, a railway, and some of the province's first labour unions, says a B.C. historian.

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